Weekly Music Planning (Ordinary Form)
  • I think it would be helpful to have a thread where we who plan liturgies and/or music can "compare notes" and seek inspiration and ideas. As my work concerns a parish which utilizes Mass exclusively in the Ordinary Form, I'd ask that this particular thread be utilized solely by others who are planning liturgies and/or music for OF (Ordinary Form) Masses each week.

    To contribute to uniformity on the thread, I ask that everyone please utilize the following format when posting. Also, please keep questions to a bare minimum and criticisms non-existant on this thread to avoid unnecessary clutter. The purpose of this thread is solely to be a source of information, not a thread for discussion. Thanks in advance for getting into the habit of posting your parish's info weekly (or whenever there is a major Mass)!

    Once again, OF liturgies only, and please cut and paste this format when posting. If there is special music during a particular Mass (i.e. for a Baptism, Confirmation, Dismissal of the Catechumens and Elect, etc.) please included this in the proper place.

    Parish Name: (St. Anonymous if fine)
    Parish Location: Deep South (City, State or Region is fine)
    Liturgy: Mass for Baptism of Our Lord

    Introit or Entrance Hymn: Dilexisit (Introit Hymn), Tietze
    Kyrie or Rite of Sprinkling: Kyrie, spoken
    Gloria: Psalm Tone Gloria (Adoremus Hymnal)
    Responsorial Psalm: Respond & Acclaim, OCP
    Alleluia or Gospel Acclamation: Respond & Acclaim, OCP
    Credo: Spoken
    Offertory: When John Baptized By Jordan's River
    Eucharistic Prayer Preface: Spoken
    Sanctus: Chant (Latin), Mass XVIII
    Mysterium Fidei: English Chant Mass
    Amen: Chant, traditional
    Lord's Prayer: Spoken
    Agnus Dei: Chant (Latin), Mass XVIII
    Communion Hymn 1: Ave Verum Corpus, Mozart
    Communion Hymn 2: None
    Post-Communion: None
    Final Hymn: Joy to the World

    I look forward to seeing your contribution to this thread!
  • Yes, these are useful and RPInet.com does this regularly. We should keep in mind the ethos of the CMAA forums though. Maybe Jeffrey can comment.
  • I hope that this will be a viable thread topic because, if nothing else, I suspect that there are many others like me who would greatly appreciate the examples and ideas of others for inspiration in their own music planning. Other sites certainly do have this function but, as a young member of the CMAA charged with planning and executing our parish's music program, I find the competence, experience and knowledge concentrated within this organization to be at such a high level that it is unmatched on other "sacred music" websites and in other liturgically focused forums.

    As is clearly stated, the goal of the CMAA is "the advancement of musica sacra in keeping with the norms established by competent ecclesiastical authority." Some people, like myself, either have little or no regular personal contact with other music directors and are not music professionals. All the same, we are seeking to bring our parishes better in line with the liturgical directives of the Church as regards sacred music.

    Out of the many educational and inspirational threads available on the Musica Sacra forum, one single thread devoted to keeping others abreast of our own liturgical planning in an effort to educate and inspire does not seem like too much to ask.

    I would greatly appreciate if a thread such as the one I have proposed here be allowed. As all are doubtlessly aware, not every parish music program is run by a professionally trained choir master or musician with a degree in choral direction or vocal performance and endless professional contacts in the field. Of those parishes who utilize the services of volunteer, non-professional music coordinators, many (like ours) are willing and able to help (at least musically) with the Reform of the Reform. But sadly (at least in my case), the Internet is almost the sole source of our information as to how to do just that. A plain and straight-forward thread like this one would be of great benefit, especially considering the fact that this is "friendly territory" as regards our collective views.

    Of course, I bow to the competent authorities in this matter and, if it is decided that such a thread is somehow against the "ethos of the CMAA," I will gladly drop the subject.
  • DogwoodSouth,

    Didn't mean to be a wet blanket. I'm interested in seeing weekly programs too. I think people should keep in mind that weekly lists of mostly OCP fare would be rather pointless here. I too, like to see what folks are doing outside of that "box".
  • AOZ
    Posts: 369
    I don't think there is any question that most readers come to this site to see something other than OCP fare, and that is what we aim to provide. However, for the purposes of this thread, I don't think it is necessarily bad to list a Respond & Acclaim Psalm setting if that is what you are really doing. Is it the CMAA ideal? No. But it is the truth, and others who visit the forum will see that you may be struggling, just like they are, with striking an artistic, and sadly, political balance in your parish from week to week. Advising against OCP and like materials might actually discourage participation in the thread.

    What will be interesting, if this thread persists, is to see how the shape of our liturgies change over time.

    My personal opinion, of course.
  • priorstf
    Posts: 460
    I sing in 3 choirs, which respectively are 100% Gather, 100% WLP and 100% semiannual hymnal (I forget the publisher). In one of them our choir director is locked in battle with the long-entrenched music director to bring in some real music, but we can do so only in preludes, second offertory and second communion. Is this purgatory?
  • bsven
    Posts: 20
    From a church musician stuck inside the box, who nevertheless considers it time off Purgatory, I thank you, Dogwood, for your generosity in sharing your work. I will respond with the same.
    Parish name: St. Mark, Wheaton, Illinois, Joliet diocese
    Parish location: American midwest
    Liturgy: Mss for Baptism of Our Lord
    Introit: Come Down, O Love Divine
    Kyrie: spoken
    Gloria: Hylton
    Res. Psalm: OCP
    Alleluia: OCP
    Credo: spoken
    Offertory: Songs of Thankfulness and Praise
    Eucharistic Prayer Preface: spoken
    Sanctus: Owen Alstott
    Mysterium Fidei: Eng. chant, Sacramentary
    Amen: same
    Lord's Prayer: spoken
    Agnus Dei: Owen Alstott
    Communion hymn: meditations from the organ:
    Ave Verum Corpus; and Dialogue on the Vox Humaine, Couperin.
    Post-Communion: Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silent
    Final Hymn: All Hail, Adored Trinity
  • SECOND SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME 2008

    Parish Name: St. Anonymous ;-)
    Parish Location: Deep South
    Liturgy: Second Sunday in Ordinary Time (A)

    Introit or Entrance Hymn: Omnis terra (Introit Hymn), Tietze
    Kyrie or Rite of Sprinkling: Kyrie, spoken
    Gloria: Heritage Mass, Alstott, OCP
    Responsorial Psalm: Respond & Acclaim, OCP
    Alleluia or Gospel Acclamation: Respond & Acclaim, OCP
    Credo: Spoken
    Offertory: The Church's One Foundation (tune: AURELIA)
    Eucharistic Prayer Preface: Spoken
    Sanctus: Chant (Latin), Mass XVIII
    Mysterium Fidei: English Chant Mass (Memorial Acclamation A)
    Amen: Chant, traditional
    Lord's Prayer: Spoken
    Agnus Dei: Chant (Latin), Mass XVIII
    Communion Hymn 1: Communion Proper from Anglican Gradual
    Communion Hymn 2: Hail to the Lord's Anointed! (Tune: ELLACOMBE)
    Post-Communion: None/Silence
    Final Hymn: In Christ There is No East or West (Tune: McKEE)
  • bsven
    Posts: 20
    The prototype that I listed previously will be the same for the Sundays in Ordinary Time, except of course that the hymns change, so I won't bother to list all. However, in two weeks, we will begin singing the Lord's Prayer (English chant). And, during Lent we will sing the Ordinaries in Latin. Also, whenever I get English Propers from Fr. Weber, I use the Communion proper with Psalm verses. I have never seen the By Flowing Waters, but am interested in looking at it after hearing witness on one of these sites. Also, I play a Mass in another parish once a month, and there (this Sunday) I use the Gregorian Introit, Alleluia, and Communion Antiphons from the Gregorian Missal, the Psalm in English from Fr. Weber (if available), the Gregorian Mysterium Fedei, the Pater Noster, plus one hymn, the Offeratory. All Ordinaries in Latin. The priest usually speaks the Mass in English, although last month he said the Eucharistic Prayer in Latin. It's an interesting mix of Latin and English, and it seems to work. I have no problem going in and out of English and Latin, just so long as the chant is beautiful.
  • I know that Mike's comments weren't meant to discourage establishing such a regular "feature" thread in this forum, but I second his cautionary remarks, if for only the issue of redundancy. The lists posted at RPInet are a pretty good reflection of the cross-section of approaches to OF programming now going on.
    And I fear that there's a sort of "cognitive dissonance" within this proposal: It's not that CMAA is pro "this" or anti "that," it's the reality that with the lack of coherency among contemporary hymnal/worship aid resources, posting our lists here (a safe haven for both philosophy and pedagogy) wouldn't really add anything of substantial import to the high quality of discourse this forum provides. Au contraire, my lists alone would cause much rubber-necking and puzzling remarks like "How the heck did that happen?"
  • David AndrewDavid Andrew
    Posts: 1,191
    priorstf,

    I am right there with you. I have commented on other threads that I would love to be able to approach something more along the lines of music for the OF drawn from the Graduale, Gregorian Missal, etc., and throw in some polyphony. As it stands, I'm fighting the "we're a large parish, so you need to keep everyone happy by sticking close to 50/50 between the "red book" (Worship III) and the "blue book" (the old Gather 2nd ed.)" which of course really means sharing the misery rather than trying to elevate the quality.

    No, it's not purgatory because the Catechism of the Church tells us that it's a period of "purification, so as to achieve the holiness necessary to enter the joy of heaven." (1030). Singing garbage music week after week while being "permitted" to sing the good stuff at really odd points in the liturgy (second offertory? huh?) is really torturous, which we're assured purgatory is not. You're actually in a form of Pharohnic bondage, to which we must all cry, "LET MY PEOPLE GO!"
  • G
    Posts: 1,387
    "Singing garbage music week after week while being 'permitted' to sing the good stuff at really odd points in the liturgy (second offertory? huh?) is really torturous, which we're assured purgatory is not. You're actually in a form of Pharohnic bondage, to which we must all cry, 'LET MY PEOPLE GO!'"
    LOL
    But a question: is "second offertory" all that unusual?
    We don't do it, but I have gathered that having one piece for the money gathering and one for the actual offertory procession is a relatively common compromise in parishes where someone is valiantly trying to fight the 4 hymn sandwich and gradually [pun intended,] work in the occasional proper or choral anthem or motet.

    (Save the Liturgy, Save the World)
  • paul
    Posts: 60
    Gee G,

    work in the occasional proper or choral anthem or motet is exactly what I'd like to glean from this forum. I admit my knowledge of the repertoire isn't total and if you know of a great motet on a proper text, I'm all ears.
  • Thanks to Aristotle Esguerra, a poster in this forum:

    http://www.cantemusdomino.net/polyphonic-propers/
  • G
    Posts: 1,387
    Oh, Paul, I hope I didn't write anything to imply I had any of the answers.
    Me, I'm all about questions.

    (Save the Liturgy, Save the World)
  • David AndrewDavid Andrew
    Posts: 1,191
    Since I'm in the typical suburban parish celebrating the OF in the typical "blended worship/hymn sandwich" paradigm, I'm figuring anything I can do to raise the bar is progress.

    I won't (and shouldn't) bore you with the rundown of the regular stuff, but here's what the choir will be singing for the anthem at the offertory for the Sundays in Lent. I've picked these based as much on what the texts of the Mass of the day call for, but it's a slow process. Much of this repertoire will be newer to the choir, and certainly to the ears of the congregation:

    Lent I: Call to Remembrance (Farrant)
    Lent II: Hide Not Now Thy Face (Farrant)
    Lent III: Sicut Cervus (Palestrina) OR Like as the Hart (Howells) => (The choir isn't accustomed to polyphony like this, so I'm leaning towards the Howells)
    Lent IV: The Lord is My Shepherd (Rutter)
    Lent V: De profundis (ps. 130) (Charpentier) => This will be a really interesting experience for them!

    We will also sing the communion antiphons/psalms as set in BFW at the beginning of the communion rite, while the emhc's are receiving.
  • paul
    Posts: 60
    Great Stuff, David. Tell me about the Charpentier, and where's a good place to find it. What key do you sing Sicut Cervus in?
  • gregpgregp
    Posts: 632
    Parish Name: St. Anonymous
    Parish Location: California
    Liturgy: 3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

    Introit: The Lord walking by the sea of Galilee (Anglican Use Graduale)
    Entrance Hymn: Joyful, joyful, we adore thee (OCP)
    Kyrie: spoken
    Gloria: Heritage Mass (Alstott)
    Responsorial Psalm: Respond & Acclaim, OCP
    Gospel Acclamation: Alleluia - Simple Graduale
    Credo: Spoken
    Offertory Antiphon: The Right Hand of the Lord (AUG)
    Offertory: Where Charity and Love prevail
    Eucharistic Prayer Preface: Spoken
    Sanctus: Danish Amen Mass
    Mysterium Fidei: Danish Amen Mass
    Amen: Danish Amen Mass
    Lord's Prayer: Spoken
    Agnus Dei: Chant (Latin), Mass XVIII
    Communion Antiphon: Follow me and I will make you fishers of men (AUG)
    Communion Hymn 1: Ubi Caritas
    Post-Communion: None
    Final Hymn: Church of God, elect and Glorious (OCP)
  • David AndrewDavid Andrew
    Posts: 1,191
    Paul,

    The Charpentier was something I stumbled across at CPDL. Being unfamiliar with it, I asked a friend who said that it's a "falso bordone" setting of the psalm chant. It's homophonic (as one would expect with a falso bordone) with two shorter sections sung by a solo voice.

    I'm going to compare it to whatever I find in the Liber Usualis to see if I can figure out more about it.

    The Sicut cervus was also a CPDL find. The edition found there is in A-flat, and the editorial information indicates that it was originally pitched a minor third lower.
  • Here is our program for the first week of Lent. The full schola is not singing, so this lineup is for only 4 singers.
  • gregpgregp
    Posts: 632
    Jeffrey, I have a question about your programs (which are beautiful, btw). Do you get feedback from your parish staff or the congregation on them? Specifically, while I applaud the effort you make to include English translations for all the Latin texts, I'm wondering how many people actually take the time to read them and pray with them, or follow your singing with them in mind.
  • Well, Wilko Brouwers was just here and he was amazed at how strong the singing was. I'm not sure how many people use the programs to follow the Latin but people are pleased to pick them up and carry them home. I like that neumes are so beautiful and so suggestive of liturgical sensibilities - sort of puts people in the right mood. In any case, by making programs like this, we completely immunize the music program from the #1 objection to Latin that people can't understand the words. In our case, we've never heard that complaint, so doing these programs is more than worth it.
  • Here is our program for Laetare. I'm getting more brazen about posting this stuff since we started doing full Mass settings and, now even (!!!!!), singing the Introit as the processional. Exciting times for us. I hope we don't goof it up.