Modus Cantandi Alleluia
  • M. Jackson Osborn, in this discussion, brought my attention to the Modus Cantandi Alleluia (p. 825ff in my Graduale Triplex). What exactly is this? I first thought it was alternate Alleluias to be sung in place of the antiphons during Paschaltide, but then I thought maybe it would be addendum Alleluias for the antiphons themselves in that season. However, that doesn't make sense, since they end with Alleluias already. Any illumination on the subject?
  • These alleluyas are indeed (I think) alternates for the Eastertide antiphons. I think that I suggested drafting them into service because they were relatively easily learnt by congregations and would be far more appropriate liturgical fare than the cute little happy-clappy triple alleluyas which are so (astonishingly) ubiquitous in our worship these days.

    At the soon-to-be Cathedral Church of Our Lady of Walsingham we have set aside the alleluya in the Anglican Use Gradual and are doing the mode IV alleluya as found on p. 23 of the triplex - Advent II and other times. We have been doing this for a few weeks now and it gets better every week. It's really beautiful to hear 200 people singing something like this. Many of these alleluyas are not at all difficult and are quite within the capabilities of the average parish.

    About that one in the Anglican Use Gradual, it, too, is worth trying in your churches. It is very, very, easy and has a brief, simple, but nice jubilus.

  • mahrt
    Posts: 503
    These are actually the alleluias to be added to the introit, offertory, or communion during Eastertide, in the event that the chant is borrowed from another part of the year. They are borrowed from chants of the Easter season, for example the alleluia for introits, mode 1, is borrowed from the Seventh Sunday of Easter, (Triplex, p. 241), or by taking the last two of three alleluias, for example mode 4, from the introit of Easter Friday (Triplex, p. 211), or from commons, for example, mode 8, from the Common of Virgins (Triplex, p. 498).

    The three-fold alleluias so often used today, particularly the one from the Lauds of the Easter Vigil of the extraordinary form (FGAF, GAGFDC, FGAGFF), are drawn from the Divine Office, where their function is quite different—relatively simple antiphons for the chanting of a whole psalm. But the essence of a Mass alleluia is the jubilus, the melisma upon the last syllable of the word alleluia. This ecstatic little musical part forms an anticipation of the Gospel that cannot be expressed by the simple syllabic three-fold alleluia.

    So I concur emphatically with Jackson Osborne that it is far better to teach the congregation one of the archetypal alleluia melodies, as the one he suggests, and to use it for several Sundays, or even throughout the whole year (though I would be inclined to use a different one for each season, perhaps three or four in the year).
  • Unfortunately, it's one of those deeply entrenched today expectations : that the "Gospel Acclamation" come with many times repeated Alleluia. Typically (around here, pretty much universally) that would be : threefold Alleluia from the cantor or choir; thrice more as repeated by congregation; then the verse; the three more Alleluias. Every time we learn a new one (as now, for Advent) this pattern is followed.

    So, to get from there to a single jubilus followed by the verse -- one melody per year or four -- would be... an uphill battle.
    Thanked by 2Steve Collins ryand
  • Yes, Andrew. A very uphill battle. The PIPs are under the distinct impression, what with the new Mass being totally in their own language, that the OWN the liturgy. Even suggesting that they would be just as actively participating by listening to the choir is like taking something of theirs away from them - maybe even in punishment. The traditional single "Alleluia" would be considered double punishment since it would be fewer Alleluias AND LATIN GREGORIAN CHANT. I consider that calling it the "Gospel Acclamation" instead of the "Alleluia Verse" is the only HONEST thing that has come out of the modernist liturgical reform!
  • I am not as resigned to the burden of current popular habits as Steve and Andrew. With some serious teaching from pastors, and a firm commitment from them and our musicians all things are possible. The worst of Vatican Two happened over-night. People were just told that this is what we are doing now. If it's not learning fifteen or twenty neumes of an alleluya, its anything else (and most anything will do) that sets off the whining and childish grumpiness of our resident grinches. Catholics can do everything that our naysayers high and low, in and out of holy orders, say that they can't, or won't. And they will do what too many say that they won't - they will do it if their priests really want them to. And, it's not just the lack of pastoral impetus, it's musicians who don't know, and will not learn, these alleluyas and think that therefore (a non sequitur) 'the people' couldn't possibly learn them. Priests and musician-teachers are the way to betterment or the rut of entrenched and cultivated ignorance. Yawheh's name should be sung with love, and no number of notes is 'too many notes'. These cute, silly, dumb, tasteless little happy-clappy triple alleluyas do not do our heavenly father the honour which he is due. I'm literally amazed that people sing them with a straight face.

    (As always, the worst thing we can do is throw up our hands in despair. Doing this just makes things sweet for our detractors, and makes Screwtape's job so much easier.)
  • M. Jackson Osborn, in this discussion, brought my attention to the Modus Cantandi Alleluia (p. 825ff in my Graduale Triplex). What exactly is this? I first thought it was alternate Alleluias to be sung in place of the antiphons during Paschaltide, but then I thought maybe it would be addendum Alleluias for the antiphons themselves in that season. However, that doesn't make sense, since they end with Alleluias already. Any illumination on the subject?


    Wait, why does this question feel so familiar...?
    Thanked by 2CHGiffen Adam Wood
  • I tried, alright!

    It's not easy searching for these things, especially if you only have the official text in Latin.