For your consideration . . . .
  • RagueneauRagueneau
    Posts: 2,592
    May I share something very odd with you all?

    The Pentecost Seasonal Psalm reverses the order of the last two verses.

    Observe:

    Here is the Pentecost Sunday Psalm:

    R. (cf. 30) Lord, send out your Spirit, and renew the face of the earth.
    Bless the LORD, O my soul!
    O LORD, my God, you are great indeed!
    How manifold are your works, O LORD!
    the earth is full of your creatures;
    R. (cf. 30) Lord, send out your Spirit, and renew the face of the earth.
    May the glory of the LORD endure forever;
    may the LORD be glad in his works!
    Pleasing to him be my theme;
    I will be glad in the LORD.
    R. (cf. 30) Lord, send out your Spirit, and renew the face of the earth.
    If you take away their breath, they perish
    and return to their dust.
    When you send forth your spirit, they are created,
    and you renew the face of the earth.
    R. (cf. 30) Lord, send out your Spirit, and renew the face of the earth.

    And here is the "Seasonal Psalm":

    R. (cf. 30) Lord, send out your Spirit, and renew the face of the earth.
    Bless the LORD, O my soul!
    O LORD, my God, you are great indeed!
    How manifold are your works, O LORD!
    the earth is full of your creatures;
    R. (cf. 30) Lord, send out your Spirit, and renew the face of the earth.
    If you take away their breath, they perish
    and return to their dust.
    When you send forth your spirit, they are created,
    and you renew the face of the earth.
    R. (cf. 30) Lord, send out your Spirit, and renew the face of the earth.
    May the glory of the LORD endure forever;
    may the LORD be glad in his works!
    Pleasing to him be my theme;
    I will be glad in the LORD.
    R. (cf. 30) Lord, send out your Spirit, and renew the face of the earth.

    Can anyone explain this?
  • G
    Posts: 1,391
    I do not know this for myself, but I have read that the lectionary has its share of simple typos, inadvertent repetitions (in the case, for instance, of the same only-vaguely-related-to-the-Gospel gospel acclamation 2 weeks running.)

    Save the Liturgy, Save the World
  • My first intuitive explanation: incompetence.
  • gregpgregp
    Posts: 632
    "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity."
  • This kind of foible is widespread in the 1998 U.S. Lectionary.

    There are even variations among different, official printings of the Lectionary.

    A few examples that pop to mind are the (senselessly) different versification of Psalm 19 for the dedication of a church versus (IIRC) 3OT-A, varying translations of the “The Lord sent me to bring glad tidings to the poor” Gospel verse, and too many wording changes from one appearance of a psalm to another to count.

    At NPM 2006 I met a lady from www.songsinhispresence.com; they apparently have a collection of through-composed responsorial psalm settings but that lack many keyboard accompaniments. (Mara, are you reading? Any update on that collection?) Anyhow, they unearthed myriad inconsistencies in the psalm texts in the process of putting this together; in some of their current publications, you literally see things like alternate single words for different days, when the entire rest of the psalm is the same.

    Hopefully the next Lectionary revision will yield us a more consistent volume. (It is noteworthy that the Ordo lectionum Missæ lacks these discrepancies.)
  • RagueneauRagueneau
    Posts: 2,592
    Felipe,

    One of the discrepancies you mention:

    COMMON (SEASONAL) RESPONSORIAL PSALM from the Lectionary (Lectionary page 1003):

    "Last Weeks in Ordinary Time"

    Psalm 122:1-2, 3-4ab, 4cd-5, 6-7, 8-9

    R. Let us go rejoicing to the house of the Lord.

    Because of my relatives and friends
    I will say, "Peace be within you!"

    But when the same thing happens on the 1st Sunday of ADVENT, Year A:

    Psalm 122:1-2, 3-4, 4-5, 6-7, 8-9

    Because of my brothers and friends
    I will say, "Peace be within you!"
  • marajoymarajoy
    Posts: 781
    Felipe:
    I believe that Songs in His Presence is in the process of becoming part of International Liturgy Publications (http://www.ilpmusic.org/) which, while this company may not be of much musical interest to readers of this forum, it IS interesting that they are putting together a hymnal which they hope to be a serious competitor to "the big three." I have not seen either an actual copy of this hymnal nor anything like a song list, but I have been told it is heavy on contemporary compositions, although many by new composers who haven't been able to break into the publishing ranks of "the big three," as well as "a fair amount of chant and traditional hymns," whatever that means. (But I'm a fan of any company which makes GIA/OCP/WLP nervous!)

    Anyhow, I am under the impression that this collaboration has halted plans for writing keyboard accompaniments to the already composed complete lectionary psalm settings.
  • Check out this very infomative website:

    catholic-resources.org/Lectionary/

    especially where the differences between the 1970 and 1998 USA lectionaries are spelled out in detail:

    catholic-resources.org/Lectionary/Differences-USA1970-1998.htm

    In the case of Pentecost, the text as it stands in the 1998 lectionary (with the last two verses switched) is a typo - it doesn't match up with the official Latin edition (nor with the verses listed in the USA lectionary itself!).

    As you can see, there are quite a large number of discrepancies between the current (1998) USA lectionary and the official edition. The most surprising is where, for responsorial psalm for the 2nd Sunday of Easter, the USA lectionary has the same verses for all three years for the cycle (A, B and C) by mistake (!), whereas the Latin lectionary has different verses for each of these Sundays (although the same antiphon). This error was first made in the 1970 USA lectionary, but was nit corrected in the latest (1998) USA edition.

    Sam Schmitt
  • BruceL
    Posts: 1,060
    I remember at some point in the past few years, I changed from the opinion that "if we just all go by the book, everything will be perfect" to "if we just all go by the book, we'll be okay, but should really get to work on revising the books", in large part due to discrepancies like this. At our school Masses during OT, we use a common Psalm. When looking for musical settings of the text, I kept running across these sort of issues. At first, I thought perhaps I wasn't reading the corrected version of the NAB Psalms, but then just figured someone was asleep at the wheel...