Best Way to Avoid Copyright Violations
  • If you were intimidated by the copyright situation I outlined in a longer post (and, frankly, you should take it very seriously), there is an easy way to set you mind at rest.

    Go to Corpus Christi Watershed and look at all the amazing music you are free to perform (with proper attribution--that never changes.) Seriously. On the, oh, semi-annual occasions when I actually PICK the music, I go there, run off anything that seems appropriate, and stand in a practice room at CUA singing away until I find something that fits the situation perfectly.

    If anyone knows of any other sources, it would be great to know.

    Kenneth
  • While I am sure something pops up there from time to time that actually is not public domain, CPDL, which is run by contributor CHGiffen, deserves a mention.
    Thanked by 1amindthatsuits
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 11,279
    With use of CPDL and IMSLP, it would be possible to operate a music program with little or no budget. You just couldn't buy new stuff, but some of the new stuff isn't so great.
    Thanked by 1amindthatsuits
  • I would like to support new composers here, but CPDL is invaluable. iMSLP, with its many facsimiles of original editions, might be a bit daunting to a neophyte, but I am using it to learn to read choral scores.

    But are there other sources of good,new, and free music like CCW?

    And it raises the interesting point that avoiding copyright problems may lead you to program better music.

    Kenneth
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,713
    While I am sure something pops up there from time to time that actually is not public domain, CPDL, which is run by contributor CHGiffen, deserves a mention.

    First, although I'm the president of CPDL, it is run by a seven member board of directors who donate their time and effort freely. In addition, much of the behind-the-scenes work is carried out by other users committed to the continual improvement of the CPDL ChoralWiki and its offerings. One such very active user (and administrator) familiar to members of this forum is Richard Mix.

    Second, CPDL has a vigilant copyright issues group that watches submissions to CPDL diligently and, with legal advice when necessary, responds to questions of copyright infringement.

    Third, more than 15% of CPDL's works are classified as Modern music, which is more than those classified as Romantic music. Here is a continuously updated listing of newly available modern music scores within the past 90 days. The vast majority of CPDL's music is in the sacred/religious music realm.

  • JL
    Posts: 171
    The Orthodox Church in America has a large collection of pieces, mostly in English, with permission to duplicate "for liturgical use only." (Whether or not it is limited to Orthodox liturgical use is unclear, but could probably be settled with a few e-mails.) Most of the offerings are within the reach of the average parish choir, and it's really hard to beat the eastern Churches for beautiful liturgical poetry. I'd be tempted to program a different setting of the Paschal Troparion (they have about 30, in different languages and voicings) for each Sunday of the Easter season.

    http://oca.org/liturgics/music-downloads
  • JL
    Posts: 171
    Also, a search for "hymnal" on archive.org will turn up tons of public domain stuff. You'll have to page through tons of schlock, but surely there are a few gems hiding in there somewhere.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 11,279
    I had occasion to contact the Greek archdiocese and ask about copying some scores for Sunday use. They were most generous and cooperative.
    Thanked by 1amindthatsuits
  • On my phone and the "thank" icon is missing. Thanks to one and all. Good to know CPDL has modern things as well.

    Kenneth
  • Accidentally answered another thing here. And now my phone won't let me delete it.
  • irishtenoririshtenor
    Posts: 1,221
    The link that JL shared about music for download on the website of the Orthodox Church in America is pretty cool. Check it out!
    Thanked by 2amindthatsuits JL
  • I maintain collections of music which is known to be public domain. I have a separate collection of music that is still under copyright and that I have confirmed is covered by our Parish's license. Anything which is doubtful I do not use.

    I have been given a number of copied scores for pieces where I cannot trace the copyright owner and have summarily refused to use them. I don't earn enough money to pay copyright infringement fines, and if the parish gets hit with a fine I will most certainly lose my job!
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,577
    I use music that is almost always a century old or more. A WLP rep came in the other day to see me with promotional material of this latest offerings and I told him this and he looked at me like I had two heads. What is it about "patrimony" that people just don't seem to understand?

    We are using the SEP and the Weber and I compose the responsorial, but that's about it for new music. Otherwise we use the GR and select traditional hymns and that's it. Oh, I do play some modern organ music. See www.myopus.com for samples (shameless plug)
  • he looked at me like I had two heads


    In the world inhabited by most publishing reps, you might as well have two heads. The notion that 'newer is better' has (almost) thoroughly infected the publishing industry, I'm afraid.