An anecdote RE: Gloria translation
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    I was talking with a lady some years older than I who was aghast at the new translation. "It's so difficult, how am I supposed to explain to my kids what something like 'consubstantial' means?"

    Response: I don't know, maybe along the same lines as how you explained "transubstantiation" to them?


    BIG WORDS ARE SCARY
  • canadashcanadash
    Posts: 1,391
    Kids like big words. I don't know why we underestimate the abilities of our children.
  • Kids like big words. I don't know why we underestimate the abilities of our children.


    EXACTLY! Kids also like good, "adult-style" liturgy. They eat it up - the incense, the bells, the vestments, etc. I remember my first parish with a school. We had a school Mass scheduled on the Solemnity of St. Joseph, so I made sure we had incense and the whole nine yards. The children were "into it" so much more that day than many of our other school Masses that utilized the children's lectionary (which should be burned in your next bonfire, IMHO) and other attempts to make it "kid-friendly" (i.e. dumbed down).
  • If you think "consubstantial" is hard, how about strange words like "Pharisee," "Gehenna," "trespasses," "hallowed," "sabbath," "repentance," and "resurrection"? And if her kids become scientists, they'll have to learn what "experiment," "entropy," and "electron" mean. (Oh, and a gold star to the one who can fully explain to me what "grace," "love," and "holy" mean.)
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,160
    When any celebrant takes a couple of minutes to learn how to pronounce "Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachtani" correctly, I'll listen to their kvetching about Glory texts.
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 2,343
    E-lo-eye, E-lo-eye, Lay-ma sa-bak-tay-neye?
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,068
    When any celebrant takes a couple of minutes to learn how to pronounce "Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachtani" correctly

    First of all, it's Aramaic "Eli, Eli, lama sabactani" (some put "lema" for "lama") and not Hebrew, as Hebrew was not the vernacular of the time. That aside "Eloi" is a two syllable word with the "oi" sounding something between "ee" and the Russian "ы" (yeru). The accent on "Eli" or "Eloi" is on the second syllable. The accent on "lama" is also on the second syllable, pronounced roughly as "luh-MAH". The real kicker is "sabachtani" with the "s" something between "s" and "sh" and the accent is on the third syllable, so that the "a" sounds in the first two syllables are somewhat schwa. The "c" or "ch" is probably heard as a hard "k" but could also be rendered as "kh" (the "ch" in Loch Lomond or Bach).

    Listen to the pronunciation by noamika at this site or the pronunciation at this site (which put the accent on the second syllable of "sabachtani").
    Thanked by 1SamuelDorlaque
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,160
    Chuck, you pedant! Give me credit for the idea at least. I was waiting to have blood drawn while pecking out that post on my phone! And it was a funny point, btw.
  • And explaining "one in substance" is any easier? At least with "consubstantial" you cant gloss over it, thinking the meaning is obvious. It isn't.
    Thanked by 2Salieri MatthewRoth
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 2,343
    Well, 'consubstantial' really is un-explainable, since the substance in which Christ is 'One in being with the Father' is the substance of the God-Head, which our mortal minds cannot even hope to comprehend.
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    A cracker becoming the physical presence of God (in multiple locations multiple times daily) ... and then we eat God - that is not just as un-explainable?
    Thanked by 1Salieri
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 2,343
    Mysterium Fidei est.

    And a host ain't a cracker - crackers need salt. And cheese!
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 9,854
    crackers need salt. And cheese!


    And beer!
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 2,343
    And beer!

    From Trappists
    Thanked by 1CharlesW
  • Jesus warn't no cracker. He was a good Jew boy.