• I understand the Credo, Domine is the official song for the pontifical Year of Faith. Does anyone have any information regarding this song such as author, sheet music, translation, on-line links and even links to hear the music. Thanks
  • PeterG
    Posts: 28
    domenici,
    Go to www.annusfidei.va/content/novaevangelizatio/.../inno-musicale.html
    The 'hymn' is available as a PDF. However the verses are in Italian! And English translation is promised 'soon'.
    Peter G
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 5,647
    yea, i was just looking at it earlier today. a bit schmaltzy, but whatever. i want to see the translation.
    Thanked by 1E_A_Fulhorst
  • Earl_GreyEarl_Grey
    Posts: 561
    I stumbled upon that site months ago. The "comming soon" translation has still not arrived.
  • Mike R
    Posts: 106
    I've seen a translation currently in process...not sure whether it's the "official" one. It's not great, but there isn't much they can do given the original Italian.
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 4,687
    I don't read Italian, and I can't find the lyrics outside of the sheet music (to Google-Translate it).
    Can anyone provide an unofficial translation?

    Something about walking and being burdened by concerns that distract us from God, some hope for the future, some "brotherhood of man" nonsense... or something?

    They say "time flies," but it kinda looks like the 1970s only recently made it to Rome.
  • Earl_GreyEarl_Grey
    Posts: 561
    It might work as an Italian- English duet alla Andre Bucelli and Charlotte Church ( or Josh Groban and Celin Dion). ;)
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 4,678
    Here's a translation (from the Italian text):

    CREDO, DOMINE

    Inno per l’Anno della Fede


    CREDO, DOMINE
    Hymn for the Year of Faith

    Camminiamo, carichi di attese,
    a tentoni nella notte.
    Tu ci incontri nell’Avvento della storia, sei per noi il Figlio dell’Altissimo. Credo, Domine !
    Con i santi, che camminano fra noi, Signore, noi ti chiediamo:
    adauge nobis fidem !

    Credo, Domine, adauge nobis fidem !


    We are walking, laden with waiting,
    groping our way in the night.
    You meet us in the Advent of history; you are for us the Son of the Most High. Credo, Domine!
    With the saints, who walk among us, Lord, we ask you:
    adauge nobis fidem! [Increase our faith!]
    Credo, Domine, adauge nobis fidem !

    Camminiamo, deboli e sperduti, senza il pane quotidiano.
    Tu ci nutri con la luce del Natale, sei per noi la stella del mattino. Credo, Domine !

    Con Maria, la prima dei credenti, Signore, noi ti preghiamo: adauge nobis fidem !

    Credo, Domine, adauge nobis fidem !


    We are walking, weak and lost, without our daily bread.
    You feed us with the light of Christmas, you are for us the star of the morning. Credo, Domine !
    With Mary, the first of believers, Lord, we pray to you: adauge nobis fidem !
    Credo, Domine, adauge nobis fidem !

    Camminiamo, stanchi e sofferenti, le ferite ancora aperte.
    Tu guarisci chi ti cerca nei deserti, sei per noi la mano che risana. Credo, Domine !

    Con i poveri, che attendono alla porta, Signore, noi t’invochiamo:
    adauge nobis fidem !

    Credo. Domine, adauge nobis fidem !


    We are walking, tired and suffering, our wounds still open,
    You cure whoever seeks you in the deserts, you are for us the hand that heals. Credo, Domine !
    With the poor, who wait at the door, Lord, we call to you:
    adauge nobis fidem !
    Credo. Domine, adauge nobis fidem !

    Camminiamo, sotto il peso della croce, sulle orme dei tuoi passi.
    Tu risorgi nel mattino della Pasqua, sei per noi il Vivente che non muore. Credo, Domine !

    Con gli umili, che vogliono rinascere, Signore, ti supplichiamo:
    adauge nobis fidem !

    Credo, Domine, adauge nobis fidem !


    We are walking, under the weight of the cross, in the prints of your foot steps.
    You arise on the morning of Easter, you are for us the Living One who does not die. Credo, Domine !
    With the humble, who want to be reborn, Lord, we beseech you:
    adauge nobis fidem !
    Credo, Domine, adauge nobis fidem !

    Camminiamo, attenti alla chiamata di ogni nuova Pentecoste.
    Tu ricrei la presenza di quel soffio, sei per noi la Parola del futuro. Credo, Domine !

    Con la Chiesa, che annuncia il tuo Vangelo, Signore, ti domandiamo:
    adauge nobis fidem !

    Credo, Domine, adauge nobis fidem !


    We are walking, attentive to the call of every new Pentecost.
    You recreate the presence of that breath, you are for us the Word of the future. Credo, Domine !
    With the Church, which proclaims your Gospel, Lord, we ask you:
    adauge nobis fidem !
    Credo, Domine, adauge nobis fidem !

    Camminiamo, ogni giorno che ci doni, con gli uomini fratelli.
    Tu ci guidi per le strade della terra,
    sei per noi la speranza della meta. Credo, Domine !

    Con il mondo, dove il Regno è in mezzo a noi, Signore, noi ti gridiamo:
    adauge nobis fidem !

    Credo, Domine, adauge nobis fidem !


    We are walking, every day that you give us, with our brother men (human beings),
    You guide us by the roads of the earth,
    you are for us the hope of the destination. Credo, Domine !
    With the world, where the Kingdom is among us, we shout to you:
    adauge nobis fidem !
    Credo, Domine, adauge nobis fidem !

    = = =

    Good luck to anyone adapting this to English. When I read it, the chorus from Nabucco is what comes to mind, but surely something more suitable can be made.

    Actually, come to think of it, there may already be a similar song in English: "Lord, I believe" (1988), by John Polce; I used to hear it in charismatic renewal events. It's not exactly whitelist material, but the text is OK. I think it was anthologized in the songbook "Songs of Praise" (Servant Books).
  • Thank you very much for the translation. I recently learned to sing the song for the opening of the Year of Faith in my parish. I am debuting Wednesday evening October tenth for our bishop and congregation. I translated the song myself, but am much more impressed by your version. Thank you, once again!
    Dom Lenci
  • Luai
    Posts: 2
    Here is the official Arabic version of Credo Domine
    With a singer from the Holy Land. Rabab Zaitoun

    Thanked by 1chonak
  • And here is the sheet music in English.

    From the Annus Fidei site
    Thanked by 1chonak
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 4,678
    Thanks for posting the recording by Rabab Zeitoun: a beautiful voice.
  • Kathy
    Posts: 3,401
    Um, about the translation, good it is not.
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 4,678
    It reflects the original that way.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 5,067
    I don't like the layout, either. Nine pages? You've got to be kidding. Standard hymn format would have been nice.
  • Seriously? This is what we get?

    I'll pass....
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 5,067
    Who wrote this? It's awful. I think I will use "Faith of Our Fathers."
  • I propose a hymn tune contest, at least, though anything this irregular can't possibly be singable.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 5,067
    Hey, it is an improvement. With an accompaniment, I could get by with this. Still like "Faith of Our Fathers."
  • Kathy
    Posts: 3,401
    I think it's a lovely tune!

    The text inscrutable remains.
  • Well, Charles, I suppose the text could be rewritten and crammed into Faith of Our Fathers:

    Pilgrims of expectation full,
    Searching in darkness [for the way],
    Lord Jesus, come, the Father show,
    You are the Son of God Most High.

    R. Credo, O credo Domine,
    With all the saints along the way.

    Pilgrims despairing, gone astray,
    What shall we eat along the way?
    Your birth, O Lord, feeds us with light,
    You are, for us, the Morning Star.

    R. Credo, O credo Domine,
    With Mary, first to trust in you.

    Pilgrims, exhausted, full of pain,
    Our bleeding wounds are open still.
    In deserts, we are seeking you,
    And you stretch out your healing hand.

    R. Credo, O credo Domine,
    With all the poor, who yearn for help.

    etc.

    (PS. Is this a new theological thing, being fed with light? or did I miss something in catechism?)
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 5,067
    No, I like the melody you posted. I could pull that one off with an accompaniment. A couple of my choir members could sing it fairly easily. "Faith of Our Fathers" will only replace the original.
    Thanked by 1E_A_Fulhorst
  • A dreadful piece this hymn is, text and music.

    I know that my pastor won't use it, in English, in Spanish, or in Latin (is there a Latin version?). Deo gratias.

    What was wrong with "Faith of Our Fathers"? Other than there being no 'faith of our mothers' according to certain quarters? Or that choosing an English hymn would offend others?

    Or why not a text by Bl. John Henry Cardinal Newman? Or Doctor of the Church St. Hildegard von Bingen?
    Thanked by 1E_A_Fulhorst
  • mahrt
    Posts: 355
    Why are we calling this a hymn?
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 4,678
    Patricia, the song was originally written in Italian and is being adapted to other languages, so "Faith of our Fathers" didn't enter into it. It's an initiative related to the Vatican's preparations for the Annus Fidei.
  • Chonak, I wasn't serious about 'why wouldn't "Faith of Our Father" have been picked' :-) All I meant was that, surely there are poets among the Church Triumphant or the Church Militant from whose work a text could have been adapted! This is neither good poetry nor good theology, and the music is trite.
    Thanked by 1E_A_Fulhorst
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 5,067
    Patricia, it is trite. Makes me think there is an Italian Marty Haugen out there somewhere.
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 2,207
    Haugen could've done better. I think you meant Landry.
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 4,678
    I imagine some Vatican committee invited people to submit compositions for an official "hymn", and this is the result. The judges probably did not include James MacMillan or Abp. Hilarion Alfayev.
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 2,207
    Morricone, where are you when we really need you?
  • Kathy
    Posts: 3,401
    Today, in order to re-present and honor the Council, the bishops gathered for the Synod processed as the Fathers had, 50 years ago today.

    They processed to this, um, hymn.

    It might have been just desserts, if this were a procession commemorating Concilium. But it was not.
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • Here’s a video of Credo, Domine from the Papal Mass for the opening of the Year of Faith:

  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 2,207
    Gross Gott im Himmel, salve nos, I couldn't make it passed 1:40.
    Makes Montani tunes sound like Beethoven. OTOH, it has little chance of ever becoming an ear worm.
  • it has little chance of ever becoming an ear worm.


    I disagree. Proof:

    Thanked by 1Gavin
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 4,678
    Does that organ in the Vatican video sound right? Every time they cranked it up for the refrain, the organ seemed to dwell noisily around d7 to f#7, which I already hear lots of, thanks to tinnitus.
  • TCJ
    Posts: 392
    "What was wrong with "Faith of Our Fathers"? Other than there being no 'faith of our mothers' according to certain quarters? Or that choosing an English hymn would offend others?"

    Ritual Song actually has "Faith of Our Mothers" - I kid you not. It's one of the new verses they added in to the original. They also have a version that has something like "Faith of our sisters and brothers, too".
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 5,067
    I use RitualSong, so I have seen that verse. The original English hymn once had a Marian verse. GIA is not the only company that has tinkered with verses. It's pretty common.
  • Earl_GreyEarl_Grey
    Posts: 561
    The verse in question originally read:

    Faith of our Fathers, Mary's prayers,
    Shall win our country back to Thee

    There were actually two versions of the hymn by the original author: one was published in England and another in Ireland. Even the standard public domain version varies from the original. The latest editions of Gather and Worhsip only retain the first verse, still altered from the original. The other verses are newly written and very PC. This info is all from he conpendium to Worship III. I actually started researching this hymn when I first heard about the Year of Faith and then noticed the various versions of the text.
  • Earl_GreyEarl_Grey
    Posts: 561
    Here's the complete text by Faber:
    FAITH OF OUR FATHERS (original text: varied for England and Ireland)

    1. Faith of our fathers! Living still
    In spite of dungeon, fire and sword:
    O how our hearts beat high with joy,
    Whene’er we hear that glorious word:
    Faith of our fathers, holy faith!
    We will be true to thee till death.

    2. The martyrs, chained in prisons dark,
    Were still in heart and conscience free:
    How sweet would be their children’s fate,
    If they, like them, could die for thee!
    Faith of the martyrs, holy faith!
    We will be true to thee till death.

    3. Faith of our fathers! Mary’s prayers
    Shall keep our country fast to thee; [Shall win our country back to thee;]
    And through the truth that comes from God,
    O we shall prosper and be free! [England shall then indeed be free]
    Faith of our mothers, holy faith!
    We will be true to thee till death.

    4. Faith of our fathers! We will love
    Both friend and foe in all our strife:
    And preach thee, too, as love knows how,
    By kindly deeds and virtuous life.
    Faith of our fathers, holy faith!
    We will be true to thee till death.

    Text: Frederick W. Faber, 1814-1863
  • Earl_GreyEarl_Grey
    Posts: 561
    Updated Version as appears in Gather III and Worship IV:
    Text : Frederick W. Faber 1814-1863; St. 1, Faber; sts. 2-4, Alfred; Sts. 2-4 © 1981, Joseph R. Alfred
    Tune : ST. CATHERINE; LM with refrain; Henry F. Hemy 1818-1888; James G. Walton 1821-1905; Adapt. by Walton Public Domain


    1. Faith of our fathers, living still
    In spite of dungeon, fire and sword;
    Oh, how our hearts beat high with joy
    Whene’er we hear that glorious word.
    Faith of our fathers, holy faith,
    We will be true to you till death.

    2. Faith of our mothers, darling faith,
    Your work for Christ is love revealed,
    Spreading God’s word from pole to pole,
    Making love known and freedom real.
    Faith of our mothers, holy faith,
    We will be true to you till death.

    3. Faith of our sisters, brothers too,
    Who still must bear oppression’s might,
    Raising on high, in prisons dark,
    The cross of Christ still burning bright.
    Faith for today, O living faith,
    We will be true to you till death.

    4. Faith born of God, O call us yet;
    Bind us with all who follow you,
    Sharing the struggle of your cross
    Until the world is made anew.
    Faith born of God, O living faith,
    We will be true to you till death.
  • Faber's text is wonderful.
  • Earl_GreyEarl_Grey
    Posts: 561
    I particularly like the line about Mary's prayers winning our country back.
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 4,678
    Especially suitable for countries under the patronage of our Lady (e.g., the United States, under the patronage of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception).
    Thanked by 1E_A_Fulhorst
  • GavinGavin
    Posts: 2,629
    Just to play agent provacateur (as David calls me), if a hymn is, as has been said before, "a song of praise, directed at God," in what sense is "Faith of Our Fathers" a hymn?
  • Earl_GreyEarl_Grey
    Posts: 561
    In the same sense that any Marian or other devotional hymn praises God. Any song that honors a saint or exhorts some aspect of the Christian life ultimately glorifies God.
  • I'm sorry, but I can't stomach this hymn. What can we do? I know someone on the liturgy committee at "The Parish" is going to scold me for not doing it. I'd rather teach them to sing the Credo as commemoration - but that won't fly. Can anyone suggest a worthy alternative that would have some historical weight? Plain clothes Sister M. who teaches at CUA (Parce mihi, Domine) will be shaking her finger at me at the next meeting....Ideas?
    Deo Gratias.
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 2,207
    I haven't heard squat about it from pastor, administrator, anyone. Maybe 'cause I described it to the pastor as "doggeral," I dunno. If asked, I'll say "I'm in the process of revising it."
  • Earl_GreyEarl_Grey
    Posts: 561
    I don't know anyone in my Diocese who is using Credo Domine (or has even heard of it for that matter). I used Faith of Our Fathers as a closing hymn for the "kick-off" weekend, but that's about it. I think teaching a sung creed would be a good idea, but I doubt it would be widely accepted.
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 2,120
    You might give my simple English Credo. The link is to another topic here at MSF, and it contains PDFs both for a harmonized/accompanied 4-part setting and for the melody in square note notation, as well as an MP3 sound file.
    Thanked by 1Earl_Grey
  • Why not just teach congregations to sing the Credo I, III, or IV?
    Guess I'm simple-minded, but actually singing a traditional Credo in a language that unites Latin Catholics around the world for the year of faith seems apt to me.

    Italian soft rock seems... less apt. in terms of beauty and universality.

    Our congregation owns Credo III, which is not my favorite but hey, and they're not above-average intelligent. They're just normal Catholics.

    And boy, do they hit 'Faith of our Fathers' out of the park.
  • GavinGavin
    Posts: 2,629
    It beats the pants off "Gather us in."

    That's the best thing I can say about it.