• bkenney27bkenney27
    Posts: 443
    Hi folks,
    It has been a while since I have posted on here and have just returned to Catholic Music after leaving my previous parish and spending an "Interim" year at a congregational church with an exceptional music program. I am pleased to have found an orthodox Pastor with whom I expect to work through the struggles of returning Catholic tradition back to the parish. He has already done great work which has made the transition back to the tumultuous world of Catholic music much easier for me.

    That said: I have previously used a Gloria for Christmas/Easter that I do not feel suits the traditional nature of this parish. Does anyone know of any good plainsong settings of the gloria that utilize brass? I'm thinking perhaps just an introductory fanfare to the Roman Missal setting, etc?
  • Does it have to be in English?
  • bkenney27bkenney27
    Posts: 443
    Eventually, no. But for now, yes. I'm happy to field suggestions in Latin for future use as well!
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 1,214
    It's not plainchant of course, but the Proulx parts still work with D. 872.
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 3,435
    ... any good plainsong settings of the gloria that utilize brass?
    This sounds a bit confusing: plainsong settings ... that utilize brass. What sort of brass ... trumpets, horns, trombones, tuba? My own feeling is that brass (accompaniment?) might destroy the plainsong nature of the chant.

    On the other hand, a Gloria setting such as that in my own Missa Ascensionis Domini, although written with accompaniment for organ, could easily be played/accompanied by brass instruments (eg. a brass quartet). The singing of the Gloria can be either SATB or in unison (probably best until the congregation is comfortable with it). I can supply brass parts upon request.


  • Brass is for occasions where chant isn't good enough...
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,466
    There are these brass parts I wrote for a priest who was looking for something to go with Ostrowski's Mass in Honor of St. Ralph Sherwin

  • Again, not exactly chant per se, but Br. Michael O'Connor's Siena Chant Mass (found in the St. Michael Hymnal IV) seems to lend itself to brass adaptation of the organ accompaniment.
  • doneill
    Posts: 141
    If it's just an intro that you want, check imslp.org for some brass arrangements of Gabrieli intonations, and see if you can match one with the mode of the Gloria. They should be labeled "primi toni," etc.
  • bkenney27bkenney27
    Posts: 443
    YES. The Dingess for the win! That is almost exactly what I was looking for. I'll take a look a those. Many thanks!

    My own feeling is that brass (accompaniment?) might destroy the plainsong nature of the chant.


    And mine, too. I was inspired by something I saw at the Vatican for the Easter Vigil a few years ago (2012?) where BXVI intoned the Gloria and organ went NUTS while the bells were ringing before the schola picked up with "et in terra pax...". So I was wondering if there were any arranged interludes/introductions to facilitate that with brass musicians. It is not necessarily my intent to have the brass accompany the chant - but rather for the organ and brass to augment the chant, as the Dingess has done with interludes and at the Amen, or perhaps in alternatim when the congregation sings, as an introduction... etc.

    Brass is for occasions where chant isn't good enough...

    Hmmm... I see your point, but I disagree. I think Brass, used well (if it allows the authenticity of the chant to prevail by taking a backseat) only augments the majesty of chant tradition and the liturgy as a whole. Used poorly, of course, it is an entirely different matter and stomps all over the tradition. Brass is also a marvelous way to add solemnity to a Mass which, at the present time, simply canNOT be exclusively chant.

    @doneill - I'll poke around a bit. Great suggestion, thanks!
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,466
    ...as Dingess has done


    You forgot "the."

    The Dingess.
    Thanked by 2bkenney27 eft94530
  • bkenney27bkenney27
    Posts: 443
    Of course. My humble apologies. :)

    Fixed. hahaha
    Thanked by 2eft94530 ryand
  • I think Brass, used well (if it allows the authenticity of the chant to prevail by taking a backseat) only augments the majesty of chant tradition and the liturgy as a whole


    So churches that never, ever use chant really, really, augment the majesty of the chant tradition and liturgy? And all churches that never use chant do this to further give chant pride of place?

    Brass is also a marvelous way to add solemnity to a Mass which, at the present time, simply canNOT be exclusively chant.
    But you are stating that for your parish only, right?
  • bkenney27bkenney27
    Posts: 443
    I don't think you're understanding what I'm saying, but I can't make sense of your last comment to know for sure. Are you against using Brass?

    And yes, for my Parish or any Parish in that situation.
  • Not to speak for him, but I think Noel was talking about how, given the current culture in your new parish, the music you select
    canNOT be exclusively chant
  • Hello! I was wondering if OP ever found a solution for this. I am looking to do something similar and struggling to find the brass / organ parts.

    Thanks for your help!
  • There are many introductions to the Roman Chants written for organ by composers on IMSLP.org that might be transposed for brass. Just search by the name of the Mass or by the Mode.

    There are a HUGE amount of short pieces written to be used as intonations of chants. Diebold did them for the Requiem (and other Masses), organ interludes between chant that transitioned between the modes.

    It's not organ accompanied chant but organ intoning modes between chants.

    Link
  • Thanks so much !!! Much appreciated.
    Thanked by 1noel jones, aago